Curriculum Planner Units Grades 1-8

The following curriculum units have been wriiten by teachers for the new Ontario Curriculum using the Ontario Curriculum Planner. They may be downloaded in PDF format, using Acrobat Reader, by clicking on the name of the unit following the unit description below. If you do not have Acrobat Reader installed on your computer, you can obtain a copy from http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep.html. Copies of the units in the Curriculum Planner format can be downloaded using the Curriculum Planner CD.

Units Available by Grade
Click on the title to get a description of the unit

Grade 1

Portrait of Me
Relationships, Celebrations and Traditions
Kids in Quilts
The Local Community Grade 1 Social Studies Unit
A Space For Us: Social Studies and World Connections
PPP...Patterning: Properties of Patterning
Life Systems: Zoo Central
Energy in our Lives
Matter and Materials
Tiny Town
Family Matters

Grade 2

Boxcar Derby Structures and Mechanisms
Call it home communities
Relationships, Celebrations and Traditions
The Toy Factory Measurement
Watch them Grow Living Things Grow and Change
What a Performance
A Space For Us: Social Studies and World Connections
PPP...Patterning: Properties of Patterning
Life Systems: Zoo Central
Features of Communities Around the World: Social Studies
Energy from Wind and Moving Water: Energy and Control
Pattern Play in the Arts: Patterning Algebra and Numeration
Traditions and Celebrations: Past and Present
Tiny Town Structures and Movement
Making Connections Opening the Windows of the World
That's a Wrap!
Toys, Toys, Toys
, Structures and Mechanisms

Grade 3

Call it Home Communities
The Great Cover Up Patterning and Algebra
The Great sleep Over Eat Drink and Stay Within Budget
The Toy Factory Measurement
Watch them Grow Living Things Grow and Change
Traditions and Celebrations: Past and Present
Early Communities in Ontario: Pioneers
Forces and Movement: Energy and Control
A Blast from the Past: H&C: Pioneer Life and Medieval Times
Life in an Ecosystem: Plants and Habitat
Ontario and Canada: Ours to Discover and Promote
A Garden of Patterns
That's a Wrap! Patterning and Algebra and Geometry
Life Systems Plants and Animals: Out of this World
Life Systems-Plant Growth (Environmental Factors)
Long Ago Before I Was Born: A look at Life in Early Settler Times

Grade 4

Can you Bear it Pulleys, Gears, Forces, Structures and Mechanisms
Granite Island
Saving the World
Sound Good Vibrations
Step into Fitness
The Great Cover Up Patterning and Algebra
The Great sleep Over Eat Drink and Stay Within Budget
When Disaster Strikes Rocks, minerals, Erosion and Weather
A Blast from the Past: H&C: Pioneer Life and Medieval Times
Life in an Ecosystem: Plants and Habitat
Ontario and Canada: Ours to Discover and Promote
Life Systems: Habitats and Communities: Something Fishy in Ontario
Medieval Times: Heritage and Citizenship
Our Candian Pavilion: Landforms, Resources and Government
Exploring Ontario's Patterns An Integrated Grade 4 Math Unit
Through the Ages Heritage amd Citizenship
Toy Challenge Creating the Ultimate toy Store
Life Systems Plants and animals: Out of this World
Inside Outside Habitats and Human Organ Systems
Light and Sound to the Rescue: energy and control
Light Sound and Energy Conservation: Energy and control
Polygon Puzzlers: Geometry and Spatial Sense

Grade 5

Can you Bear it
Create your Own Weather
Energizing our School
Energy Dreams by Design
Math in Architecture
May the Force Move You
When Disaster Strikes
Our Candian Pavilion: Landforms, Resources and Government
Canada and the World: Canadian Government & Trading Partners
Through the Ages: Heritage and Citizenship
Inside Outside Habitats and Human Organ Systems
Light Sound and Energy Conservation: Energy and control
Polygon Puzzlers: Geometry and Spatial Sense
Ancient Civilizations
CAREER CAPERS Counting on Statistics
Early Civilizations: Community Planner
Making a Game of It: Data Management and Probability
Sturdy Structures: Structures and Mechanisms
The Conservation Clubhouse: Energy and Control
The Genesis Project A New Life Convention
Time Travellers: Heritage and Citizenship

Grade 6

Aboriginal Peoples and European Explorers
Energy Dreams by Design
Into Space A Mathematical journey
May the Force Move You: Forces Acting on Structures and Mechanisms, and Motion
Plane Math
Canada and the World: Canadian Government & Trading Partners
Geo Visions: Design and Construct: 2D/3D Geometry and Spatial Sense
Canada's Trading Partners and Themes of Inquiry
EPI, Energy Private Investigators: Energy and Control
Flighter than Air : Investigating Air and Flight
Going Up: Mechanisms and Stability
Making a Game of It: Data Management and Probability
What are the Odds You'll Get The job? Data Management and Probability
Electricity Games Galore Energy and Control
Inside the Circle: First Nations in Canada
Settling a New Courntry: Aboriginal People/New France
The Genesis Project A New Life Convention
Time Travellers: Heritage and Citizenship

Grade 7

L'Alimentation: Bon Appétit, Bonne Santé
Suspense: Reading, Writing and Reviewing
Canada's Trading Partners and Themes of Inquiry
Themes of Geographic Inquiry
World Travels: Mathematics Unit
Geo Visions: Design and Coinstruct: 2D/3D Geometry and Spatial Sense
Natural Resources
Life Systems: Interacting Organisms
B.N.A./Developing Western Canada : New People, New Lands
A Growing Nation New France
Bubbles in the Hot Tub: A Guide to Getting In and Out of Hot Water
EPI, Energy Private Investigators: Energy and Control
Going Up: Mechanisms and Stability
Settling a New Courntry: Aboriginal People/New France
Conflict and Change: Its Nature and Patterns
Heat: Energy and Control
Natural Resources and Economic Systems
Pathways to New Beginnings: British North America
Patterns in Physical Geography
The Themes of Geographic Inquiry and Migration
Turning Up the Heat: A Unit of Study Investigating Heat Energy

Grade 8

Confederation
Racing Against Time: A Decision Making "Challenge"
World Travels: Mathematics Unit
Life Systems: Interacting Organisms
Structure and Mechanisms: Mechanical Efficiency
Turn Up the Radio! Canada's Changing!
Canada: A Changing Society: A Historical Investigation
A Growing Nation: Confederation
B.N.A./Developing Western Canada : New People, New Lands
Bubbles in the Hot Tub: A Guide to Getting In and Out of Hot Water
Economic Systems Geography
The Themes of Geographic Inquiry and Migration
Natural Resources and Economic Systems
Migration
Optics: Energy and Control

 

Portrait of Me, Grade 1

Description
This unit focuses on developing the skills and knowledge in the Data Management and Probability strand. Students are presented with the culminating task of conducting a survey and organizing data to show their own individuality while demonstrating how they "fit" in the classroom community. Students have the opportunity to work through learning centres where they can express their opinions on familiar questions using visual arts topics such as, "What is your favourite primary colour?" "Which is your favourite art print from these choices?" "Who is your favourite illustrator?" Each activity demonstrates a different method for the collection of data. After the data is collected, students are introduced to varied methods for graphing the collected information. Students complete self-portraits to show how they are unique, yet still members of the classroom community.

Using the skills developed through their work in the unit, students are challenged to survey class members on a topic of personal choice and to organize their findings in a visual presentation that demonstrates their membership within the classroom community.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Portrait of Me

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Kids in Quilts: Patterns, Grade 1

Activities related to the unit will develop mathematical skills and knowledge in these mathematics strands: Patterning and algebra, number sense and numeration, measurement, geometry and spatial sense.
The students will explore patterns in numbers, geometry, measurement (days of the week and money), and in their environment. They will learn, through the use of a calculator and 100 chart, to explore patterns in sequential numbers as well as combining and separating number combinations. Students will make models of patterns using concrete materials, actions, and be able to extend a pattern given the pattern rule. Students will see that patterns occur in language and stories and in their environment. Through these hands-on opportunities, they will see that each pattern consists of a rule that when followed will continue the pattern. With this in mind, students will produce a square for a class quilt that will extend a given rule determined by the teacher and/or class.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Kids in Quilts

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The Local Community Grade 1 Social Studies Unit

Students will explore the meaning of a community and achieve an understanding of the importance of people, buildings, and contributions made by the community members to the community. The students will also be introduced to mapping skills such as creating a map from a bird's-eye view. This unit has been divided into eight subtasks concluding with a culminating task (subtask 8). This culminating task will allow students to apply their knowledge gained from subtasks one to seven, to produce a class model of their school community. The students will participate in subtasks that include teaching/learning activities related to :

In order to make a school community model as a whole class, the grade 1 students will divide into groups to create a specific component within their school community. This component will then be added to the class model by each group.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

The Local Community

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Energy in Our lives Grade 1

In this unit, students will explore the sources of energy and the ways in which energy is used in daily life. They will investigate devices and systems that use energy and the ways in which these can be controlled manually. Using this knowledge, students will conduct an investigation into energy use and will identify ways to conserve energy.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

18 Science and Tech Expectations

Energy in Our lives

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Matter and Materials Grade 1

The students will use their senses to learn to distinguish between objects and materials, identify and describe various materials, and identify the purpose and function of the properties of such materials. They will ask questions and identify needs and problems related to objects and materials. Using appropriate vocabulary they will record relevant observations using written language appropriate for this age level.
The unit activities require the students to sort common objects in their classroom and home environments.
Through the use of inquiry, the students will discover how the property of materials help them to learn about natural and human made materials. The students will explore how objects are the same and different, and how to use them wisely. The students will recycle and reuse common materials and describe the benefits of their new uses. The students will explore effective ways to fasten objects and materials. The students will design and produce a usable product (musical instrument) that they have self-selected. They will learn and follow the correct safety procedures in using tools, materials, and equipment safely.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Matter and Materials

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Family Matters: Relationships, Rules and Responsibilities, Grade 1

This literature-based unit has been divided into three parts:

a. teacher-directed input weeks

b. learning centre weeks

c. a week of preparation for the culminating task

The teacher-directed input weeks are used to introduce expectations using a variety of instructional strategies. These initial learning experiences will provide the foundation for the activities the students will be engaged in during the second and fourth weeks. During the two activity centre weeks, students will be producing artifacts that they will display and present to demonstrate their learning during the culminating task.
Input Weeks - During this time the teacher is introducing one lesson per day often using whole group instructional strategies. Students complete follow-up in a variety of groupings. The closure of each lesson should clearly introduce the expectations and concepts that will be expected in the following "centre week."
Centre Weeks - Students will be divided into small groups identified by a colour or name. A rotational wheel may be used. Each group will rotate through the five centres over the course of the week, visiting one centre per day. Teachers should consider balancing student abilities and gender when grouping students heterogeneously.
Week 1 - The first week of teacher-directed input lessons introduces a focus on families. This week will begin by defining the terminology to be used throughout the unit (e.g., responsibility, rule, different, similar...). The main focus of this week will be on identifying family and individual experiences and responsibilities. During this week, students will also investigate the need for rules and their consequences.
Week 2 - Students will complete five integrated learning centres based on the knowledge acquired from each input lesson from week one. These task performances will require students to create, sort, classify, design and write about the need for rules and responsibilities within their home, school and community.
Week 3 - This teacher-directed input week will link students' learning and experiences beyond family to include school and change over time. Students will brainstorm school rules and responsibilities, resolve conflicts, develop timelines and identify factors that cause change. At the end of this week, students will have an interviewing assignment.
Week 4 - Students will complete five integrated learning centres based on the knowledge acquired from each input lesson from week three. These task performances will require students to reflect, design, sequence, role-play and create a technology presentation.
Week 5 - Students will be organizing and preparing for their student-led conference and class presentation. Students will be selecting artifacts and creating a script, demonstrating their knowledge and understanding of this unit.
The input and activity centre approach is a suggested format for this unit. Teachers may choose to re-organize activity centres into whole group lessons.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Family Matters: Relationships, Rules and Responsibilities

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Relationships, Celebrations and Traditions, Grades 1/2

Through the integration of family traditions and celebrations, as well as heritage, Catholic students will explore family relationships, their religious heritage, and the rules which govern their world. The unit has been divided into six subtasks. The final task will be our culminating activity which will entail the creation and planning of a celebration which can include members of the students' community such as the priest, parents, principal, reading buddies, and the class. The students will present their scrapbook that they have created throughout this unit to their parents or to the guests that have been invited. Please see the adaptations for this subtask. 
The grade 1/2 students:

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Relationships

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Tiny Town, Grades 1/2

Students will learn that objects and structures have distinctive shapes, patterns, and purposes. They will also learn the relationship between stationary and moving objects, and that the input and output of a system is how simple machines and mechanisms can change the type and direction of the movement of an object.
Students will classify structures by purpose and interrelationship, and learn how and why the structures move or don't move. They will observe and manipulate different structures and mechanisms in a community.
At the end of the unit, students will design and make structures and simple mechanisms in the form of a Tiny Town. Grade 1 students will design and build the buildings and other structures, while the grade 2 students will build the roads and vehicles needed in the community. The students will use both human made and natural materials. Simple mechanisms will move using the principles of wheels, axles, hinges, levers, and wedges.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Tiny Town 

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A Space For Us: Social Studies and World Connections

Throughout this unit, students will develop many inquiry, research, and communication skills. Students will learn to ask simple questions, sort and classify information, and communicate information.
To prepare for the Culminating Task, students in Grade 1 will conduct research about their local community, specifically the physical features of a community and the people within the community. Students will have an understanding that certain qualities are shared by all communities ( e.g., school, gas station, hospital, police).
Students will produce a poster of a community building or design and construct a model of a community building. The students will be asked to think about a job in the community that they might like to have and to design a puppet of that community worker. The students will also be asked to talk about this worker.
To prepare for the Culminating Task, students in Grade 2 will examine communities around the world. Students will sort and classify the information comparing the similarities and differences between the various countries of the world and Canada. They will read and locate information about various world communities. Having had the opportunity to look at a variety of communities, each student will choose a specific community and prepare a portfolio on that community. In the portfolio, using pictures and words, students will present information on climate, food, clothing, homes, recreation, culture, transportation, and language. The students will also be asked to make a comparison between Canada and the other community.

Once both grades have completed their task, the class will prepare for the visitors. Students will prepare to meet the visitors and give a brief oral presentation about their discoveries.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

A Space For Us

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PPP...Patterning: Properties of Patterning

Students develop the skills and knowledge necessary to plan and prepare for a Pattern Party. Subtasks reflect both the expectations at the grade one and grade two levels.
In the subtasks students work with manipulatives to explore and represent patterns in a variety of ways. They are encouraged to see, hear, and create patterns. Students are invited to search for patterns in their surroundings. They experiment with continuing patterns, varying patterns, and predicting patterns. Students are able to distinguish between growing and shrinking patterns.
Students create "pattern" samples which they display and share at the Pattern Party. Invitations and decorations prepared for the party require the knowledge and skills learned in this unit.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

PPP...Patterning: Properties of Patterning

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Life Systems: Zoo Central

During this unit, the Grade 1 students will be learning the basic needs of living things using their senses, while the Grade 2 students will be learning about the life cycle of animals and the adaptations they have made to survive. Assuming the roles of zookeeper and zoo researcher, the students will build a model environment and include in that environment plants and an animal that suit that environment. The Grade 1 students, as zookeepers, will show, through their model and a conference, how the animal's needs are met by the environment. The Grade 2 researchers will design an animal in its natural habitat and show it during its stages of life.

Key Concepts

Grade 1
Major parts of the human body have specific functions.
Observable characteristics of living things can be described using the five senses.
Humans and other living things have basic needs and are dependent on their environment to meet these basic needs.
Humans change as they grow.
Animals adapt their movement to suit their needs.

Grade 2
Animals can be classified using observable characteristics.
Animals have basic needs.
Growth and change in an animal can be observed.
Life cycles of animals can be compared in order to understand their similarities and differences.
Animals adapt to their environment in order to survive.
Humans can affect animals.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Life Systems: Zoo Central

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What a Performance! Grade 2
Using Data to Showcase Students' Interests

This unit focuses on developing the skills and knowledge in the Data Management and Probability strand of Mathematics curriculum at the grade 2 level. Students are presented with the culminating task of making decisions based on data collected to plan a flyer for a class performance. Students will determine the information to include in order to 'entice' parents to attend the performance.
In the unit, students have the opportunity to develop an understanding of effective finite-answer questions, and subsequently, to develop questions of their own which they then use to gather data both from the performers - the class, and from the potential audience for such a performance - the parent community. Students use the recorded information to make meaningful conclusions and decisions based on it; to decide how and when to schedule the performance, to maximize the likelihood that the performance will be a success.
After examining and analyzing examples of effective and ineffective media presentations (advertisements), students plan their flyer, explaining the decisions they have made based on the data collected throughout the unit.
Finally, students produce the flyer focusing on presenting clear information in an appealing manner. This visual presentation, completed after the culminating task, assists teachers in gathering assessment data about the visual arts and an understanding of advertising media.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

What a Performance 

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Boxcar Derby, Grade 2

At the end of the unit, students participate in a boxcar race-off derby and determine which design criteria [size of wheels, weight of vehicle etc.] contribute to success.
To prepare for the derby:

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS --

Boxcar Derby

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Features of Communities Around the World: Social Studies, Grade 2

The unit will begin with a discussion and role play of community helpers. Students will draw upon prior knowledge in order to discuss and form a response: e.g., "A community is a group of people who interact to meet basic needs and within each community there are many distinguishing physical features." Students will demonstrate their understanding of community by creating their own fictitious community. This will help students appreciate that their local community is part of a larger world community; each individual, no matter where he or she lives, is part of a world created by God.
Having acquired a world perspective, the students will then concentrate on developing and demonstrating world mapping skills. Subsequently, students will return their focus to Canada and will learn how Canada's location and climate impacts on food, housing, clothing, recreation, and family lifestyles. An understanding of the influences of Canada's climate and the development of research skills will assist students to complete the unit's culminating task.
Working in small groups, the students will take the role of a travel agent in order to participate in an "International Travel Show". Students will research a country and orally present their information. Students will complete a reflection activity after each presentation in order to consider reasons why they would like to travel to each country.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Features of Communities Around the World

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Energy from Wind and Moving Water: Energy and Control, Grade 2

In this unit, students will investigate air and water as two sources of energy. They will determine that wind and moving water are renewable resources which have advantages and disadvantages in their use. Through the design and construction of wind- and water-propelled devices, students will identify factors that affect the motion and control of such devices.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Energy from Wind and Moving Water

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Pattern Play in the Arts: Patterning Algebra and Numeration, Grade 2

By highlighting specific aspects of music, art, and dance, this unit encourages students to see the relevance of patterning to their world. Students will explore how number, pattern and shape are represented in the arts. Next, students will focus on specific patterning strategies, such as identifying and extending patterns, describing patterns, constructing, representing and extending patterns. The students will apply this newly learned knowledge to the world outside the classroom, with the restoration of an art exhibition for the Museum of Patterning.
Developing an understanding of Number Sense and Numeration is necessary in order to successfully complete the culminating task. Students will be ordering numbers as well as filling in missing numbers to complete numerical patterns. Students will use skip counting as well as addition and subtraction to create musical, design, and dance pieces.
Students will explore the way shape is used in music, art, and dance. They will begin by identifying shapes in several types of media (visual art, dance, and music). Students will create shapes in their own dances and in their designs. Students will discuss how each medium in art has a geometric relationship that is carefully planned.
The students will be asked to "restore" three ancient pieces of art housed in the Museum of Patterning. These pieces include a visual design, a piece of music, and a dance. All three of these pieces have been damaged by time and the elements.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Pattern Play in the Arts

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Making Connections: Opening the Windows of the World, Grade 2

The unit, "Making Connections," is a Social Studies unit that encompasses expectations from the following four clusters: Understanding Concepts, Developing Inquiry/Research and Communication Skills, Developing Map and Globe Skills, and Applying Concepts and Skills in Various Contexts. The unit is placed into a Social Studies context, that of Features of Communities Around The World. The students will explore a variety of Social Studies concepts through whole group, small group, and individual activities.
Students will use, ask, demonstrate, interpret, construct, sort, classify, record, locate, compare, and communicate as they connect themselves to their community, their Canada, and their world. Students will see the world through their own eyes and the eyes of each other.
The unit consists of ten subtasks with students accumulating the skills and knowledge necessary to complete the culminating task.
Throughout the unit students will develop map and globe skills. They will use symbols, colour, legends, and cardinal directions to locate and record information.
Students will identify, compare, and interpret basic needs (e.g., food, shelter, clothing, recreation, language, transportation) and develop an understanding of the relationships between location, climate, and meeting basic needs.
Students will collect, sort, organize, and present information for a specific community outside of Canada.
Students will investigate significant symbols and have opportunities to create symbols representing their chosen community.
Within each subtask, students are required to create a product which demonstrates their learning. Through comparison, students will relate each product created to communities around the world. Together these products become the foundation for the culminating activity. Students will develop, acquire, and use their knowledge of features of communities as a way of showing what they know and what they can do. Each subtask will provide students with opportunities to share their learning and contribute to the perspectives and understandings of others.
These skills and new understandings will be consolidated through ongoing reflections and self-assessments
"Let Us See The World And Each Other"

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Making Connections

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That's a Wrap! Patterning and Algebra and Geometry

Students will identify patterns in everyday items (e.g., quilts, clothing, borders, wallpaper). Through a flannel-board story format, students will identify (review) and explore two-dimensional shapes and how they can be combined to produce new geometric figures. They will be challenged to identify, create, and extend various kinds of patterns, including growing and shrinking patterns, throughout the unit. The students will be encouraged to apply this new knowledge in the designing of patterned Christmas wrapping paper, bow, card, and gift.
In order to complete the Culminating Task, student understanding of shapes, transformational geometry, and the elements of design (e.g., colour, line, repetition, shape) is essential. Students will be given opportunities to create, extend, and describe both linear and nonlinear geometric patterns.
The students will design a new Christmas wrapping paper pattern that incorporates transformational geometric concepts and the elements of design. Each student will use the patterned paper, bow, and card to wrap a patterned gift that they have made for someone in need.
This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

That's a Wrap! Patterning and Algebra and Geometry

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Toys, Toys, Toys: Structures and Mechanisms, Grade 2

LEARN
The students will learn the basic characteristics and functions of simple machines (wheel and axle, inclined plane, pulley, and lever).
They will acquire and use appropriate language to describe motion.
The students will learn some components of media literacy and how to advertise their product. They will also learn about the social responsibility to be truthful and moral when promoting products.
DO
The students will describe the relationship between stationary and moving objects.
They will manipulate the type and direction of the movement of an object.
PRODUCE
The students will design and build a simple machine.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Toys, Toys, Toys: Structures and Mechanisms

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Traditions and Celebrations: Past and Present, Grades 2/3

Traditions and Celebrations: Past and Present is a combined unit for use with Grade 2 and Grade 3 students.
Students are provided with a variety of activites that develop their abilities to ask questions, gain information, and explore alternatives, such as the differences in celebrations among cultures. The students also locate information using primary sources, such as interviews, and secondary sources, such as maps, illustrations, and print material. They make and read a variety of graphs, charts, and diagrams for specific purposes. The students also have an opportunity to communicate what they find out, using drawings, oral/written descriptions, and oral presentations. The Grade 2 students continue to sort and classify information (e.g., comparing their jobs to those of their grandparents and parents). The Grade 3 students collect and evaluate information about human interactions among the early settlers and compare these pioneers to present-day family members.
This expertise enables students to complete a cooperative quilt as a culminating activity, demonstrating an understanding of the role that traditions and celebrations play in being Canadian.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Traditions and Celebrations

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Call it Home, Grades 2/3
Communities

Throughout this unit, students develop inquiry, research, and communication skills. Students use the theme of Juan, Emily, and George's adventures to examine how homes and where people live meet their needs. They research, plan, build, and present. They show understanding of how environment and housing needs are connected. Geographic and economic conditions are reflected in the type of homes people live in. A variety of dwellings are examined. 
During the subtasks, students brainstorm, plan, select, research, sort and classify information, question, collaborate, identify, locate, write, describe, illustrate, develop models, see relationships, compare, report, speak and use appropriate vocabulary. Students learn to ask simple questions, sort and classify information, and communicate information. To do this, they read stories, letters, a case study, poems and maps. They make maps, write letters, use the Internet to correspond with students living elsewhere, build a prototype home, examine kinds of homes, and more.
For the final demonstration students act as agents who are finding a home in a specific region of the world for their clients Juan, George, and Emily. Students present to Juan, George, and Emily (their class) and show a dwelling which they have built, completed a detailed picture or plan of, or produced as a photographic display. They present the research they completed to develop their suggested home and prepare for their presentation. To demonstrate understanding, students present their product to their clients (class). 

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Call it Home

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The Toy Factory, Grades 2/3
Measurement

The unit "The Toy Factory " is based on preparing a plan and trying to convince others to support it. This is a real-world activity in which the students may very likely be engaged sometime in their adult lives. By linking learning of abstract concepts to such a concrete task, it is hoped that there will be greater retention of the knowledge and skills. By making the focus a toy factory, it is hoped the children will be more engaged in the process.
By using exercises that gradually narrow the focus of the application of that skill, students will be able to successfully complete the task by taking the exercises one step further.  
This is primarily a measurement unit with additional components in geometry, number sense, and numeration. As well as the basic concepts covered, the students will also have to learn to choose between alternate problem-solving strategies. Beginning with linear measurement, the students will then explore geometry, followed by time.
The subtasks will begin with an assessment of prior knowledge so the teacher can ensure that students are adequately grounded in basic concepts. The culminating activity will be discussed and the necessary skills for its completion identified. Each required skill will then be addressed in isolation in the subtasks and then applied to the project. The students will develop a potential scenario, choose, and present it.
Students are placed in the position of having to prepare a business plan for a proposed toy factory. Included in the business plan are drawings of the proposed factory with measurements indicated on scale drawings. Schedules are to be made up for the employees for days and hours worked. As an additional exercise, an advertisement will be made for potential employees.
After the design work for the plan is complete, a floor plan, a drawing of the factory, a geometric model of the factory, a work schedule, a storage plan, and an advertisement for employees are placed on a poster board and an oral presentation is prepared to deliver to the entire class.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

The Toy Factory 

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Watch Them Grow, Grades 2/3
Living things Grow and Change

Grade two and three students will be examining the similarities and differences of living things. They will explore the physical characteristics of both plants and animals, and compare patterns of growth and change. The students will describe ways in which plants and animals adapt to changes in their environment and compare the requirements for survival. They will identify ways in which all living things are interdependent, and will develop an appreciation and respect for the environment.
Key learnings addressed in this unit are:

  1. Plants and animals can be classified according to observable characteristics.
  2. Living things grow and change in life cycles.
  3. Each plant and animal species has specific needs for healthy development.
  4. Changes in environmental conditions affect living things.
  5. All living things are interdependent. 
  6. Humans have a responsibility to care for living things and to use natural resources wisely.

The unit activities include some tasks that will involve students from both grades working together, as well as other tasks in which Grade two students will focus specifically on animals, while Grade three students will work with plants. 

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Watch them Grow 

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Early Communities in Ontario: Pioneers, Grade 3

Since the 1700s people from various countries and colonies have come to the land now called Ontario. In earlier times, this land was known as Upper Canada. The opening of this land was very difficult. Virgin forests and untamed rivers had to be conquered. The pioneer people had to start form scratch in their early settlements. Without the aid of Aboriginal peoples, especially in the areas of crop rotation, medicine, and food, many of these people would not have survived. The majority of these settlements were along the St. Lawrence River and Lower Great Lakes area, where we now have cities and towns such as Belleville, Trenton, Port Hope, Hamilton, St. Catharines, and York (Toronto).
The students begin this unit of study by becoming aware of the geographical placement of Ontario within Canada and the world. They examine and discover how a diverse collection of peoples eventually come to form cohesive settlements in Ontario. The students work cooperatively to research information on pioneers including the major components of a pioneer village (e.g., grist mill, church, school, general store, blacksmith's shop), the roles of males and females, the tools used, diet, use of natural resources, and the influences of Aboriginal peoples. After learning about the pioneers, the students compare and contrast their own lives with those of the pioneers and of the Aboriginal peoples.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Early Communities in Ontario: Pioneers

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Forces and Movement: Energy and Control, Grade 3

In this unit, students will investigate how direct and indirect forces create movement in objects. Through experimentation, students will recognize that movement is caused by an imbalance of forces or release of stored energy. Students will design and construct various devices which use controlled energy to create movement.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Forces and Movement: Energy and Control

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A Blast from the Past: H&C: Pioneer Life and Medieval Times

Students will be introduced to the pioneer life/medieval times unit by discussing their family. Students will discuss, who is in their family, the jobs all family members have within the family, if they have family members who are not from Canada or if they have parents, or grandparents who moved here from another country to live.
As a progression from the information and work they do on family life, students will begin to focus on life at school. Students will explore their role within the school population. They will look at what they are responsible for and what is expected of them in the school setting. Upon completion, students will extend their learning to examine various roles in either medieval or pioneer life. Students will be given a timeline to view that plots the medieval and pioneer eras.

While completing this unit, students will:

The teacher will guide the unit based on the overall expectations as outlined in the Ontario Social Studies Curriculum for Grade 3 and Grade 4. The teacher will provide any support or assistance necessary in order to help students develop a better understanding of their reading material, or to organize the information students are gathering. Any adaptations may be used, where appropriate, with the entire class.
At the end of this unit, through reading and collecting information, students will report orally (role-playing) and in writing their discoveries about life during the pioneer/medieval era. Students may also create illustrations about pioneer/medieval life or they may create a collage in the form of a poster to supplement their written work. The posters help to define life experienced during either the medieval or pioneer era.
Learning skills that can be assessed are class participation, independent and group work skills, problem solving, conflict resolution, and work completion.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

A Blast from the Past

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Life in an Ecosystem: Plants and Habitat, Grade 3/4

Students will begin by classifying living things according to their characterisics and functions. They will observe living things grow, move, use food, and adapt to changes around them. As the students work through the subtasks in this unit, they will make connections between the natural and human effects on living species.

In subtask 1, students will observe and classify living things.
In subtask 2, students will investigate the various ways plants and animals help each other meet their basic needs.
In subtask 3 and 4, students will identify how plants and animals get the energy they need to survive. They will learn how they are a part of a community of living things by creating a food chain.
In subtask 5, students will learn about some of the special features or adaptations of plants and animals. They will begin to make inferences and gain an understanding of how adaptations help living things survive.
In subtask 6, students will consider how habitats change over time. During this process, they will gain an understanding of how humans affect living communities in both positive and negative ways.
In subtask 7, the culminating task, students will work independently to plan, design, and create a natural habitat. The students will create this habitat in the form of a diorama. In addition, a written/oral presentation will consolidate their learning.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Life in an Ecosystem: Plants and Habitat

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Ontario and Canada: Ours to Discover and Promote, Grades 3/4

The students will use and integrate the Catholic faith tradition, in the critical analysis of the arts, media and technology, and information systems to enhance the quality of life.
The students will engage in various learning activities surrounding the following: mapping, provinces and territories, relationships/exchanges between communities and provinces, and landforms and physical features. Inquiry and research skills will be developed through various stimulating activities. The students' independent and co-operative learning skills will be further developed and strengthened leading up to the culminating activity. The culminating task will bring together all the previously learned knowledge and skills. This will be achieved and assessed through the students' commercial presentations in small groups. The commercial will be an extension of what the students have learned in an entertaining forum, developing their confidence and communication skills simultaneously.
In order to provide the students with the knowledge necessary to research, write, and present a commercial the students will:

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Ontario and Canada

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A Garden of Patterns, Grade 3

A garden offers a perfect environment for connecting patterns found in the real world, to the patterns that are an essential part of mathematical procedures. Students learn of the many patterns which can be found within a garden, whether they be patterns inherently found within nature, such as the arrangement of petals on a flower, or expressed through human creativity as beautiful gardens are designed. As students make the connection of understanding, students also develop a respect for the environment, and the sacredness of life. They come to appreciate their own gifts of creativity as they work towards developing a garden of their own.
The activities in the subtasks focus on the knowledge and skills in mathematics: understanding the concepts, applying the mathematical procedures, communicating findings, and problem solving. Students participate in activities in the areas of number patterns and environmental patterns. In each area, the students are identifying, creating, and extending patterns using a variety of manipulatives. They identify relationships between and among various patterns, and create charts to display their findings. Finally, students communicate their understanding in a written format, as well as orally.
The subtasks have been developed to allow for a natural progression of learning, by clustering expectations into specific areas of learning. Students first learn to identify number patterns as they explore patterns in the 100's chart, repeating patterns, and growing patterns. Students then identify relationships between addition, subtraction, and multiplication as they explore with arrays. Finally, students use environmental data, to create models of patterns, and display them in chart form.
The final task is set up as an ongoing project that is developed during each subtask. Students create a model of a garden in a box (a diorama) using two and three dimensional shapes. As each skill is taught, students apply their understanding directly within their project. Each subtask is set up to allow for whole group learning, and then small group practise of the concept. This gives students ample opportunity to practise each skill before they apply their understanding individually within their own gardens. Students use a "Garden Journal" to communicate understanding of the concept. Rating scales are used to measure students' understanding at each stage of the project, and a rubric is provided for an overall assessment of students' understanding. At each stage of their project, students assess their own progress using a rating scale. As the culminating task, an oral presentation allows for further assessment as students explain the patterns that they used in their gardens. Their knowledge is then applied in a new context as they create a proposal for a new garden.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

A Garden of Patterns

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Life Systems, Plants and Animals: Out of this World, Grade 3/4

Both grades' overall and specific expectations have been clustered into five themes: Needs of Plants and Animals, Physical Features of Plants and Animals, Adaptations for Survival, Food Chains, and Human Interaction. Students will demonstrate, investigate, describe, and problem solve as they work towards the culminating activity.
Needs of Plants and Animals
Grade 3 - The growth of plants is affected by environmental conditions.
Grade 4 - Various factors affect plants and animals in specific habitats.
Physical Features of Plants and Animals
Grade 3 - Plants have four major parts, each serving a specific function. Plants can be classified according to visible characteristics.
Grade 4 - Plants and animals have sets of characteristics that can be observed and described in order to study the similarities and differences.
Adaptations for Survival
Grade 3 - Plants have specific features that help them survive.
Grade 4 - Plants and animals live in particular habitats due to adaptations.
Food Chains
Grade 3 - Plants are the producers in the food chain.
Grade 4 - The food chain is a system in which energy from the sun is transferred to plants and then to animals.
Human Interaction
Grade 3 - Humans use plants for various purposes but can protect natural areas.
Grade 4 - Humans are dependent on plants and animals and can affect the natural world.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Life Systems, Plants and Animals: Out of this World

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Life Systems-Plant Growth (Environmental Factors), Grade 3

Students participate in a variety of tasks which help them to understand the basic concepts of plant growth. Research and reporting skills are developed as students gather information from various sources related to the use of plants by humans for food, shelter and clothing, and in the production of various products. They then engage in experiments related to the growth of plants as they develop inquiry, design, and communication skills. They control and alter various factors related to environment to determine the effect of these factors on the growth of plants. The observations and results obtained by students during the experiments provide them the knowledge upon which to design (devise) and build a plan for healthy plant growth. They reflect on the possible global applications of the results of their investigations.
The learning achieved from the results of the plant growth experiments are determined and assessed. As a culminating task, students produce a display of their experiment and participate in a Plant Extravaganza to demonstrate what they have learned about the interrelationship between a healthy environment and healthy plant growth.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Life Systems-Plant Growth

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Long Ago Before I Was Born: A look at Life in Early Settler Times, Grade 3

In previous grades, within the Heritage and Citizenship strand of Social Studies, students learned about community through the study of relationships, rules, and responsibilities, and explored the concept of diversity through the study of the many celebrations and traditions within our country. Building on this foundation of knowledge about community and diversity, students are ready to begin to gain an understanding of how our communities and our country's diversity came to be.
The purpose of this unit is to introduce students to the concept of the past and how it influences the present. Students accomplish this by examining the early settlement period in Upper Canada and comparing lifestyles and communities from that time with their own lifestyle and community in the present.
The unit begins with the review of concepts relating to community and the introduction to the concept of the passage of time. Students are then introduced to the early settlers: who they were, where they came from, where they were going, how they arrived, and why they came.
As students reach an understanding of who the settlers were and of their motivations, they will explore in detail life in Upper Canada upon the settlers' arrival. What existed in this area when they arrived? Where did they settle? What challenges did they face?
Once a solid groundwork has been established defining settlers and their lives, students begin to explore in more depth the nature of the early settlement period. This is approached through the study of various relationships settlers had with those around them

The relationship between the settlers and the Aboriginal peoples

he relationship between the settlers and their environment

The relationship of the settlers with one another (construction of communities)

Throughout the study of these relationships students will continually compare what they are learning to what is taking place in their communities today. This will allow them to identify and determine change over time and understand the influence of the early settlers on our present day communities.
During the unit students are expected to develop their inquiry, research, and communication skills. The unit emphasizes components of a balanced literacy program and is strongly linked to drama. The development of these skills is essential for the successful completion of the culminating activity.
The final task of the students will be to produce a Living History Fair during which the students will take on the perspective of someone from the Upper Canadian community during the settler period. The knowledge and skills gained throughout the unit will allow students to understand the various perspectives of people from different communities and from different people within each community.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Long Ago Before I Was Born

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The Great Cover Up, Grade 3/4
Patterning and Algebra

In this math unit "The Great Cover Up", students will be completing most expectations in the strand of "Patterning and Algebra" and many of the transformational expectations in "Geometry and Spatial Sense" as well as Catholic Graduate Expectations. They will work collaboratively on many hands-on activities using concrete materials. Teachers will need to ensure that they allow students the opportunity to achieve the Catholic Graduate Expectations throughout the unit.
Students will work as a whole group, in small groups, and individually, through a variety of subtasks in preparation for the culminating task assessment. The students will begin examining patterns in real-world situations, for example: looking at patterns in our Roman Catholic Church, their clothes, homes, classroom, the Arts (music, dance, visual arts), architecture, and nature. Students will then be introduced to the culminating task and will work through the following subtasks: Number Patterns and Patterns; Symmetrical Patterns; Flips; Slides and Rotations in Patterns; Quilt Border Patterns; Organized List Activities; and How Quilts Are Made.
Students will use the new skills and knowledge they learn in these subtasks to complete the culminating task. They will design a quilt model based on the Nine Patch Block design to demonstrate their knowledge of a non-linear geometric pattern. A "Nine Patch Block" design is a family of square block designs which has 3X3 units. Hundreds of quilt blocks are based on the Nine Patch Block design basis. Students will design a border to go around their quilt model to demonstrate their knowledge of a linear transformational pattern. The students will change the size of the quilt model by changing the number of blocks according to a pattern. They will demonstrate their growth pattern on a T-chart and they will use an organized list pattern to show the possible colour combinations. Students will conclude the unit with a "Friendship Celebration". The completed quilt designs will be displayed around the classroom and the students will be involved in a friendship quilt activity and prayer celebration.
The students' learning will be assessed in the following ways: observation, performance, tasks, learning logs, quizzes, and tests. Various assessment recording devices will be used such as: checklists, rubrics, and anecdotal records.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

The Great Cover Up

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The Great Sleep Over, Grades 3-4
Eat, Drink and Stay within a Budget

"The Great Sleep Over" allows Grade 3 and 4 students to develop and apply skills and knowledge in the strands of Measurement, Data Management and Probability, and Number Sense and Numeration. They will also have opportunities to hone their skills in the Language strands of Reading, Writing, and Oral and Visual Communications.
Activities building up to the culminating tasks will have students measuring the mass and/or capacity, and calculating the volume occupied by material. They will research prices and then calculate the cost of objects. They will conduct surveys and present their findings on a variety of graphs. In other activities, the students will measure the time it takes to perform everyday tasks and produce timetables to organise these events.
The students will use their newly-acquired skills to plan for a party for eight or 15 friends. The final product will be in the form of a letter of invitation to their guests, a letter of permission to their parents, and an oral and visual presentation of their plan in front of their peers.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

The Great Sleep Over

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Granite Island, Grade 4

"Granite Island" allows students to develop and apply skills and knowledge in the strands of Patterning and Algebra, Data Management and Probability, as well as Number Sense and Geometry.
Students will act as Geologists and Paleontologists to discover geometric patterns using manipulatives and number patterns using a T-table. They will conduct surveys, collect and analyse data and display findings on a variety of graphs. In addition, students will predict the probability of mining specific rocks.
Students will use these newly acquired skills to create a proposal for an Island Amusement Park.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Granite Island

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Toy Challenge, Grade 4

The main focus of this unit is to provide students with the opportunity to develop the skills and knowledge of the Data Management and Probability strand of Mathematics. In addition, several subtasks as well as the culminating task meet various expectations from The Language Arts document.
In addition to reading and interpreting data from various sources, students will be responsible for conducting surveys, making predictions, and displaying and recording data in several ways. Students will also use their knowledge of probability to compare data and use this information to make appropriate decisions.

Key Learnings are:

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Toy Challenge

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Saving the World, Grade 4
(Or One small Part of it)

Activities related to the unit are presented to develop mathematical skills and knowledge in the Mathematics strands: Measurement, Geometry and Spatial Sense, and Number Sense and Numeration. Students will review 2D shapes, identify, define and sort quadrilaterals, and create quadrilaterals based on given criteria. Students will use grid co-ordinates to identify and place objects. Grid co-ordinates will be reinforced by playing a game. Students will calculate perimeter (cm, m) and area using standard units (cm2, m2). They will create different shapes with the same perimeter and area. Using a budget of $50, students will make purchases and make change. Students will be expected to communicate their learning regularly through the use of a math journal.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS --

Saving the World

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Sound, Grade 4
Good Vibrations

Through a variety of investigations and demonstrations students will learn how sound is created (by vibrations), how it travels, and how it can be sensed and measured. As well, by exploring the factors that affect the sounds that are produced, students will begin to discover ways in which sound can be controlled.
Students will make a variety of instruments, to discover the properties of sound as well as how it relates to different materials. They will research and present a musical instrument of their choice to demonstrate their understanding of these properties.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS --

Sound

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Step Into Fitness, Grade 4

The students investigate the question, "How does activity affect pulse rate?" They explore three different types of fitness activities - muscle strengthening, aerobic, and endurance exercises - and learn about pulse as a measure of physical fitness. There are two culminating activities: participating in a fitness circuit and writing a brochure. The fitness circuit and brochure serve as the summative assessment for the unit.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS --

Step into Fitness

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Exploring Ontario's Patterns, Grade 4

Students will begin their investigations of patterns by becoming "pattern detectives." They will take a walk to identify patterns in their environment (school yard, community). Throughout the various subtasks, students will build on their prior knowledge of patterns by creating and extending linear and non-linear geometric patterns using various manipulatives such as craft sticks, toothpicks, tiles, interlocking cubes, and pattern blocks. Students will communicate their knowledge of patterns in the form of T-tables, charts, graphs, and word problems. Students will complete self-assessments and journal entries which will demonstrate their ability to communicate reflectively and creatively.
Students will prepare for the culminating task of building a new community through various activities exploring ascending and descending number and measurement patterns. Students will solve area and perimeter problems by extending a geometric grid pattern, explore number patterns through the use of calculators, apply patterning strategies to problem-solving situations by planning a class picnic, and explore how growth patterns occur in the environment by completing activities about pine tree growth in Canada. During this subtask, students will work cooperatively to defend their choices of patterning rules. They will be introduced and will use the IDEAL (Identify, Decide, Estimate, Answer, Look back) Problem Solving-Strategy. As an alternative strategy, teachers may use the Inquiry Model from the Ontario Curriculum Mathematics Document. After investigating problems dealing with garden patterns, students will have the opportunity to design and construct a "patterned" garden using art materials.
Students will work in cooperative groups to plan how they could design a layout for a new community in Ontario. They will use their knowledge of patterns and data management which they gained through the previous subtasks. Students will communicate their knowledge of what has been learned about mathematical patterns through writing a proposal, including a diagram of their new Ontario community; as well as creating their new three-dimensional rural or urban community. They will independently complete a unit test to demonstrate all of their new learning.

This unit has;

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Exploring Ontario's Patterns

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Life Systems: Habitats and Communities: Something Fishy in Ontario, Grade 4

Throughout this unit, students will utilize a variety of research methods. They will also experience numerous opportunities to take part in hands-on investigations which will guide them to their final product: a diorama of the habitat of the fish of their choice, along with a research paper.
In the course of this unit, students will use prior knowledge of the basic needs of living creatures as the basis from which to begin their investigations. They will learn about habitats, the factors which affect specific habitats, and how fish adapt to different habitats in order to meet their unique needs. Students will be able to identify food chains as systems which facilitate the transfer of energy from one source into many others and will be able to place different life forms in their proper place in a food chain.
In addition to learning about fish and their habitats and adaptations, students will come to appreciate the fragile balance of nature and how humans are affected by the extinction of animals. Students will also realize the importance of their own actions and how easily the habitats of fish can be disrupted or even destroyed by careless or negligent behaviour on the part of humans. This will reinforce the responsibility of all Catholic students to promote the sacredness of life in all its forms and to respect the environment and use resources wisely.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Life Systems: Habitats and Communities: Something Fishy in Ontario

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Medieval Times: Heritage and Citizenship, Grade 4

This unit is designed to motivate students to take personal responsibility for their learning by allowing them to share their knowledge with their peers. Activity centres are used to maximize the resources and to develop group and individual skills. A combination of teacher-directed and activity-based learning facilitates accommodation for various learning styles.
The unit is a research-based study of all aspects of medieval times. The students examine the influence of medieval society on modern Western society, working individually, in groups, and with the whole class. They conduct research to gain knowledge that enables them to become honorary citizens of a medieval village. The students design and build a medieval village, plan opening-day activities, and showcase "A Day in the Life of Onalot: A Medieval Village" to their peers and possibly the community. Where appropriate, the subtask requires students to compare medieval life with present day.
In the first subtask, students explore the concept of community, identifying components related to a present-day community in Ontario. In addition, students are introduced to the culminating task. In the second subtask, students place medieval times on a timeline. In the third subtask, students are introduced to research skills and locate relevant information from a variety of sources including a directed lesson in the library resource centre. In the fourth subtask, students begin to understand some of the features of medieval times and communicate information by designing a personal coat of arms. At this time, the class participates in a prayer celebration as they are each called by name to be members of the community. Subtask 5 is designed to prepare students to work on activities. Teachers give the students an overview of the five activities, using an organizer, to help students become familiar with the topics and the resources available. Subtasks 6 to 10 are centre-based activities on specific topics. Subtask 6 explores the social structure, including the manor system and the Magna Carta. Subtask 7 explores religious influences and subtask 8 is a reading and writing centre. Subtask 9 develops students' skill in constructing and reading graphs, charts, diagram, maps, and models. At completion of the written activity work, students design and build the medieval village. Subtask 10 is a lifestyle and family life activity in which they will analyse, clarify, and interpret information about the social, political, and economic structure of medieval society. In subtask 11, students complete a written test followed by citizenship being conferred in a prayer celebration. In subtask 12 students are planning opening-day activities with teacher direction. The culminating task is opening-day activities for tourists with the theme "A Day in the Life of Onalot: A Medieval Village."

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Medieval Times: Heritage and Citizenship


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Our Candian Pavilion: Landforms, Resources and Government

Our faith as Catholic Christians compels us to respect our environment and the people of our world, especially in their times of need. In order to combine and apply student understanding of secular and religious concepts in these units of study, students will design and present an interactive display for a Canadian pavilion for an Expo Canada from a Catholic perspective.

Grade 4
In order to prepare the students to present an interactive display and write a report on the cause and effect of the use of Canadian resources in their various regions, subtasks will include teaching/learning activities related to:

Grade 5
In order to prepare the students to present an interactive display and to write a report on aspects of the government of Canada (including how the three levels of government respond to and interact during a natural disaster), subtasks will include teaching/learning activities related to:

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Our Candian Pavilion: Landforms, Resources and Government

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Inside Outside Habitats and Human Organ Systems Grade 4/5

Grade 4 and 5 students develop their understanding of systems and how elements work together to ensure a healthy, functioning system. Students will investigate, model, and problem solve as they work towards the culminating activity.

Key Concepts:
Grade 4

  1. A system is the organization of individual elements and parts forming and working as a unit.
  2. The basic needs of plants and animals are space, food, water, air, and shelter.
  3. A habitat is the specific area in which species of plants or animals live to meet their needs. A community is a group of all interdependent plant and animal species found in a habitat.
  4. Species within a particular habitat share common characteristics and adaptations that enable their survival within that habitat.
  5. Life within a community depends on the transfer of energy.
  6. A variety of human activities can affect plants and animals within their habitat.

Grade 5

  1. A system is the organization of individual elements and parts forming and working as a unit.
  2. The human body is composed of several different systems - respiratory, digestive, circulatory, nervous and excretory - each itself composed of individual organs.
  3. The major organs of each system interact to contribute to the overall health of the body.
  4. Nutritional practices, physical activity, and environmental factors can affect the health of the body.

This unit has

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Inside Outside

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Light and Sound to the Rescue: Energy and Control

With a knowledge of light and sound energy, the students will use the design process to construct devices that will send distress signals through air and water for purposes of rescue.

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Light and Sound to the Rescue

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Light Sound and Energy Conservation: Energy and Control, Grade 4/5

The students will be given opportunities to work independently and in teacher-directed situations to study and discover the many facets of light and sound, and the uses of energy in our environment.
The grade 4 students will learn the properties and characteristics of light and sound. They will construct optical devices and musical instruments that demonstrate their knowledge. There will be a mid-unit assignment to assess the light portion of the unit and a hands-on project focusing on sound.
The grade 5 students will expand their knowledge of the different sources and forms of energy and classify them as renewable and non-renewable. They explore how devices use and transfer energy. They will design, construct, and operate devices that use and transfer energy from one form to another. They will assess the need to conserve energy and natural resources.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Light Sound and Energy Conservation

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Polygon Puzzlers: Geometry and Spatial Sense, Grades 4/5

Students will explore two-dimensional geometry as well as transformational and coordinate geometry through investigations with polygon puzzles such as, tangrams, pentominoes, etc. They will apply their learning to the design, construction, analysis, and subsequent redesign of a geometric puzzle.
Each subtask is designed to cumulatively build the knowledge and skills necessary for the culminating task. In subtasks 8 and 12, students work on activities that focus on the learning to that point and are appropriate times to use self and/or peer assessment.
This is a combined grade unit. Differentiation appropriate to each grade is described in each subtask, where necessary. In order to facilitate parents' understanding of this process, sample letters are provided.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Polygon Puzzlers

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Can you Bear It? Grade 4/5
Pulleys, Gears, Forces, Structures, and Mechanisms

Grade 4 and 5 students extend their understanding of gear and pulley mechanisms and structures. They explore the characteristics, including the advantages and disadvantages, of pulleys and gears. In this unit students design and build mechanisms within structures.
Key Learnings are:

  1. Simple machines make work easier.
  2. Pulleys and Gears change speed, direction and force.
  3. Forces are pushes or pulls.
  4. To maintain stability and integrity, structures need to withstand forces applied to them.
  5. Mechanisms are structures with moving parts.
  6. Mechanisms can be modified to improve performance.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Can You Bear It? 

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When Disaster Strikes, Grades 4/5
Rocks, Minerals, Erosion and Weather

Earth and Space Systems- Rocks, Minerals and Erosion
Key Learning Principles Grade 4:

Key Questions Grade 4:

Earth and Space Systems: Weather
Key Learning Principles Grade 5:

Key Questions Grade 5:

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

When Disaster Strikes

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Through the Ages, Grades 4/5

Students will be introduced to the topic through the use of a timeline that specifically outlines when the various civilizations occurred in history. Students will learn to formulate questions, locate books and resources, research the information they need, read, summarize and record that information in report form, and condense their information into a one-page format. They will learn to work cooperatively in a group.
Students will work in small groups to do the research. Each group of grade four students will research Christianity, the Crusades, Islam, the Magna Carta, and the features of medieval society, using an attached research guide. Each group of grade five students will research the physical and social needs of people and compare how different early civilizations met their needs, how the natural environment shaped culture, and how knowledge developed by early civilizations has affected modern society. The primary focus for both grades is on events and their effects on past and present society.
Students will produce reports on their civilization or medieval times, one-page summaries for their classmates, and present oral presentations to the class.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Through the Ages

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Energizing Our School, Grade 5
The Mathematics of Energy Conservation

The unit, " Energizing Our School" is a Mathematics unit that encompasses expectations from three strands: Number Sense and Numeration, Measurement, and Data Management and Probability. The unit is placed into a Science and Technology context, that of conservation of energy. These Mathematics activities could be done along with the Science and Technology unit that addresses the expectations dealing with the conservation of energy. The students will explore a variety of Mathematics concepts through whole group, small group and individual activities.
Students will collect, organize, display, and analyze data and explore the measurement of perimeter, area and time. Subtasks will also focus on averages, patterns when dividing and multiplying by 10, 100 and 1000 and decimal calculations with and without the calculator. These skills will be required in order to complete the Culminating Performance Task.
Students will work collaboratively and individually, focusing on specific skills that will facilitate the completion of the Culminating PerformanceTask. These skills and new understandings will be consolidated through activities and reflection in their Mathematics journals.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Energizing our School 

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Math in Architecture, Grade 5
Geometry, Measurement and Patterning

Students will explore geometric shapes and solids, and their impact on the creation of the structures in which we live. Students will explore geometic shapes and solids in the everyday world. Students will then focus on key concepts related to geometic shapes and solids, such as naming, constructing and sketching. The students will be encouraged to apply this new knowledge back to the world outside the classroom, in the construction of a Hamster House.
Developing an understanding of measurement is essential to successful completion of the culminating task. Students will manipulate tools of measurement (protractor, ruler) and develop the skills and knowledge necessary to use these tools in the completion of their task. They will measure angles, and discover that congruent shapes and angles are essential to creating stable structures. They will also discover that precise measurements are important to reconstructing models accurately. Students will explore the concepts of area and perimeter, and focus on how area and perimeter will play a role in the construction and mass production of structures.
Students will explore the mathematical patterns inherent in both geometry and mass production. Students will determine the patterns and relationships between length, width and area, and edges of a shape and the faces of its corresponding prism or pyramid. Students will extend patterns, to project the total cost of mass producing the model for retail.
The students will produce a model Hamster House, and a multi-page mathematical specifications report, which will contain precise mathematical details concerning the geometric make up, cost projections, and measurements. The report must contain adequate enough detail for a classmate to reconstruct the model using only the report.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

 Math in Architecture

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Create Your Own Weather, Grade 5
Integrating the Arts and Science

Throughout history, people have told their stories and expressed their feelings using music, visual arts, drama and dance. In this unit, just as real artists do, you will use the arts to tell about a weather system and your response to it.
In small groups, you will select a weather system and experiment with ways to tell about that weather using the arts. Together you will plan, create, produce, and perform your own composition [soundscape] about the weather.
In the planning stage, you will select a weather system and experiment with sound sources to use in your composition.
In the creating stage, you will begin to shape your composition [soundscape] by matching sounds to the main features of your weather system. You will develop a plan using the storyboard so that your composition has a beginning, middle, and end.
In the producing stage, you will develop and refine your soundscape [the actual musical composition as heard]. You will develop a soundmap [written version] of the soundscape. You will enhance your presentation with ideas from visual arts, drama and dance.
In the performing stage, you will rehearse and perform your composition for an audience.
In the critiquing stage, you will think about your performance and that of others using specific criteria.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS --

Create Your Own Weather

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Canada and the World: Canadian government & Trading Partners

This combined-grade unit facilitates the delivery of both the grade 5 and grade 6 expectations through the development of the knowledge, attitudes, skills, and habits of mind essential to responsible citizenship. Opportunities to develop inquiry/research and communication skills are used to provide starting points common to both grades. The students will develop an understanding of the importance of their Catholic social teachings in helping them to become responsible citizens of Canada and the world.
The unit is designed to guide students through the process of creating and authoring a news magazine. It includes activities to help strengthen research skills and gives information that can be used in the magazine format.

Through this unit the grade 5 students will acquire an understanding of the role and function of government at all three levels. They will become familiar with the electoral process and of their rights and responsibilities as Canadian citizens. The students will develop an understanding that a responsible Catholic citizen gives witness to Catholic social teaching by promoting peace, justice, and the sacredness of human life.

The grade 6 students will study the relationship between Canada and its trading partners, with particular focus on the United States. They will also investigate Canada's connection to one other trading partner from a different region of the world. As Catholic learners, the students will grow to understand that a responsible Catholic citizen respects and affirms the diversity and interdependence of the world's peoples and cultures.
Both grades will engage in a variety of activities that will further develop independent research and small group inquiry skills. They will have opportunities to communicate their findings in many ways, encompassing different curriculum areas.
Over the span of the unit, the students will be writing articles and creating illustrations for the purpose of producing a news magazine.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Canada and the World: Canadian Government & Trading Partners

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Ancient Civilizations, Grade 5

During this unit, students do a wide variety of activities in which they will explore ancient civilizations. Students will compare aspects of modern Canadian life to life in ancient times. Activities will include mapping, research, interpreting stories, presentations, and artistic recreations of ancient artifacts. Upon completion of this unit students should have a clear understanding of how Canada today has been influenced by ancient civilizations.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Ancient Civilizations

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CAREER CAPERS: Counting on Statistics, Grade 5

This mathematics unit, while primarily a data management and probability unit, also includes tasks that require students to develop concepts and skills in the number sense and numeration strand. Students are also required to communicate in written and oral form, therefore some language expectations are addressed and assessed.
The culminating task requires students to develop an article to be included in a careers magazine. The article includes data presented and analysed in a variety of ways in order to assist the reader of the article to make an informed decision about a future career. The subtasks involve a series of learning activities that expose students to collecting data through surveys and research. The tasks teach students to organize their data using computer applications and graphic organizers, and to analyse the data for validity and relevance. The subtasks build upon each other so that students develop an understanding of the cumulative and sequential processes involved in data management. The culminating task requires students to apply these key learnings in order to develop the content of the magazine article.
Each subtask focuses on a different step in the data-management process and requires students to utilize a problem-solving approach to learning. Within each subtask, students are provided with opportunities to learn, practise, and demonstrate learning. Students develop the following essential understandings: the role data plays in our lives, how it can influence and change our thinking, and how it can be manipulated and presented in order to make informed decisions. Students are required to reflect on their learning and to communicate their understanding of these key learnings.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

CAREER CAPERS

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 Early Civilizations: Community Planner

As students work through the subtasks in this unit, they describe what they know about present and past communities and make connections between the two. The following subtasks guide the students toward the culminating task, designing a new, authentic site for an early civilization.
In subtask 1, students are provided with a geographical and historical overview of several early civilizations. A world mapping activity is used to introduce seven civilizations. Students then complete personal and historical timelines to put time into perspective. Subtopics for group research on a specific early civilization is identified by brainstorming a modern community's needs.
In subtask 2, students read and respond to literature about early civilizations. Instruction are given on effective group work and various research skills are introduced and modelled by the teacher. Groups are formed and assigned an early civilization to research. They locate information on the community needs of their selected civilization using a data sheet based on the topics developed in the previous subtask .
In subtask 3, students become aware of the effect the natural environment has on planning communities by completing mapping activities. Combined with their research, these mapping skills are applied when groups design a new site for their early community.
In subtask 4, groups summarize and present their research findings to the whole class. A collaborative wall chart is prepared so that the basic features of all early civilizations researched can be compared. Groups of students orally present information on the influence of early civilizations on modern societies. This information provides necessary background for the student audience, who act as council members.
As a culminating activity, the community council members (student audience) have requested proposals for a new community site. Students, working in their groups (planning committees), locate and design a new community based on the needs of the civilization they have researched. Students think as ancient civilization community planners in researching, preparing their arguments, and presenting their proposal. Each ancient civilization, including Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Chinese, Incan, Aztec, and Mayan, should be represented. The proposals are presented to their community council members.
The time estimates for this unit will vary depending on students' research skill level and the number of lessons on mapping that are required. Students will need time to prepare the culminating task.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Early Civilizations

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Making a Game of It: It Data Management and Probability

In this unit, students will learn about data management and probability skills, concepts, and knowledge through the exploration of a variety of traditional and non-traditional games. Some expectations from Language and the arts are addressed and assessed within the unit. Connections to Social Studies can also be made.
Each of the mathematics tasks is centred on the theme of "games," whether it be collecting, graphing, and analysing data or investigating probability concepts. The subtasks are sequenced so that the students have ample opportunity to learn about and practise the identified skills, concepts, and knowledge before their performance is assessed in later subtasks. The investigations prepare students for the culminating task in which they design and present their own game of chance.
A variety of assessment tools are used throughout the unit. These include observation, rubrics, and checklists.
Throughout the unit students explain their mathematical thinking through the use of a math journal. Students communicate their understanding of relevant mathematics skills, knowledge, and concepts. Each journal entry is a response to one or more prompts outlined in the subtasks. Throughout the unit, the teacher will read the journal entries to maintain an understanding of how well students are understanding concepts. At the end of the unit, the students revise and edit their final journal entry and two additional self-selected entries that were completed during the unit. These three entries are submitted for scoring by the teacher (using the Journal Rubric).

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Making a Game of It

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Sturdy Structures: Structures and Mechanisms, Grade 5

Students will learn how to identify and measure various forces that act on structures (e.g., compression and tension), and describe their effects on a structure. They will learn how to use a newton spring scale to measure the force exerted by a mechanical system, such as an inclined plane, pulley system or gear train compared to exerting a force manually. (This is mechanical advantage.)
Students manipulate materials to see how triangulation of struts help to strengthen a structure against compressive forces and how ties are used to resist tensive forces. They will construct a simple load-bearing structure to withstand compressive and tensive forces (a bench), and design and make a frame structure (a bridge) that can withstand a given load.
Students will experiment with mechanical systems to determine how mechanical advantage works with simple machines. They will design and construct an amusement park ride (using a combination of a load-bearing structure and mechanical system) that will safely hold a group of people at a given weight / mass.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Sturdy Structures

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The Conservation Clubhouse: Energy and Control, Grade 5

In this unit, students will investigate forms and sources of energy, exploring the advantages and disadvantages of different sources. They will examine past and present transfers of energy and will construct and evaluate devices. They will learn about the impact of energy use on the environment, the meaning and importance of conservation, and the effects of energy shortages on their lifestyles.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

The Conservation Clubhouse

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The Genesis Project: A New Life Convention A New Life convention, Grades 5/6

Both grades' overall and specific expectations have been clustered into five themes: Foundations of Life, Components & Functions, Constructions, Change, and Adaptations. These themes provide an opportunity to introduce grade specific content within a common framework as illustrated:
Foundations of Life:
Grade 5 Key Concept: The cell is the basic unit of life.
Grade 6 Key Concept: All living things can be observed and described based on specific characteristics.
Components & Functions:
Grade 5 Key Concept: There are five major organ systems, each with a specific structure and function.
Grade 6 Key Concept: Animals have a set of characteristics that can be observed and described in order to study the similarities and differences among species.
Constructions:
Grade 5 Key Concept: Organ systems work together to perform various functions.
Grade 6 Key Concept: Animals can be most accurately classified using a system that separates them into smaller, more precise categories using structural characteristics of the animal.
Change:
Grade 5 Key Concept: Many factors contribute to the good health and function of these systems.
Grade 6 Key Concept: There is evidence which led to the theory that animals have evolved over time.
Adaptations:
Grade 5 Key Concept: Technology impacts on the function of these systems.
Grade 6 Key Concept: The environment impacts specific characteristics that enable animals to live in particular habitats.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

The Genesis Project

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Time Travellers: Heritage and Citizenship, Grades 5/6

Students are introduced to the concept of people throughout time by the teacher doing a presentation on Ancient Greece. (Notes are included with the unit.) The teacher presents the information in the fashion of delivery for a conference. Students receive a handout and partake in food from Greece. In this way, the teacher has modelled what the students are expected to do in their culminating task.
The students are introduced to a variety of Early Civilizations/Nations by mapping them on a world map. Students review how to locate information on a blackline master from a map. Grade 5 students map Early Civilizations with the teacher due to the difficulty of mapping twelve civilizations that cover many countries throughout the world. Grade 6 students map Aboriginal People, the routes of Early Explorers, and the Land Bridge Theory. Grade 6 students work independently because they just focus on Canada, which makes the task easier. In this way, the students are introduced to possible groups of people they would like to study. Groups are formed and the students are assigned a civilization/nation, or choose, one that they would like to study.
As a whole class, students are given the 'big questions' to interpret. These are the three overall expectations for each grade phrased as questions. The common expectation between the two grades is the influence of the environment on the culture. Students do activities that help them understand the two key words: 'environment' and 'culture,' relating these to their personal experience and knowledge. This common expectation is given to the students as a question. The students learn how to formulate smaller questions from an overall expectation phrased as a question. In this way, the students are more aware of what they are required to research. Students are also provided with tools to conduct research: SQ2R (Scan, Question, Read, and Record) Students present their research to the class at the Time Travellers' Conference.
Using the information they have viewed (at the conference) and have been given (student made handouts), students wrap up the unit by comparing at least two cultural groups by choosing subtopics to direct their analysing. Students present their analysis in a creative manner.
By the end of the unit, the students are expected to have learned:
In Social Studies;

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Time Travellers

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Energy Dreams by Design, Grades 5/6
Electricity and Conservation of Energy

Key Learnings
Grade 5: There are many forms of energy, which humans use for a variety of purposes.

Grade 6:

NOTE: Individual Key Learnings are attached to the relevant Subtask.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

 Energy Dreams by Design

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May the Force Move You, Grades 5/6
Forces Acting on Structures and Mechanisms, and Motion

Key Learnings

Grade 5

There are many types of forces that can act upon an object: air pressure, mass, compression,tension.

Motion can be classified into four types: linear, rotational, reciprocating and oscillating.

Different forces have different effects on different structures and mechanisms.

The motion of an object, stationary or moving, can be changed by applying a force.

Mechanisms can change the amount of effort required to move an object or load.

Mechanisms change one type of motion into another and transfer one type of energy into another.

Forces acting on structures and mechanisms can be both identified and measured.

Forces acting on structures and mechanisms can be countered.

There are skills and strategies required for scientific inquiry and technological design.

There are skills and strategies required for scientific inquiry and technological design.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

 May the Force Move You

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Aboriginal Peoples and European Explorers, Grade 6

This unit focuses on the history of North America for the time period beginning with Aboriginal Peoples' origin theories up to, and including, early European exploration (approximately the early 17th century). 
Through their participation in this unit, students will identify ways in which the environment molded Aboriginal cultures, identify early explorers and describe their impact on the development of Canada, and demonstrate an understanding of the social, political, and economic issues facing Aboriginal peoples in Canada today. As Catholics, we are compelled to look at these issues in order to develop our respect and understanding of the history, cultural heritage, and pluralism of today's contemporary society. 
The students will be required to apply previous knowledge and understanding of environment and communities, and their interrelationships, to the specific context of the earliest stages of the development of our country.
The learning expectations have been clustered as those that address: ways in which the environment molded Canadian Aboriginal cultures; the impact of the early explorers on the development of Canada; inquiry, research, and communications skills as they apply to this topic; and the application of this history to the current social, political, and economic issues facing Canadian Aboriginal peoples today.
In order to accomplish the subtasks, students will view films, share written materials and use maps, discuss with their peers, research with partners, present related current events, reflect in their journals on an ongoing basis, and prepare a dramatic historical re-enactment.
Students will make use of primary and secondary research sources to learn about Canada's Aboriginal peoples and the early European explorers who encountered them. In their search for relevant information about the past and present, they will be taught to create pertinent questions and focus on specific research. The students will be involved in small group research to develop the content of their group's historical re-enactment.
This unit allows ample opportunities for cross-curricular integration. These have been noted at the end of each subtask. This factor has been included in the consideration of time. Many of the activities are designed to be running concurrently both within the Social Studies block and across other subject areas.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Aboriginal Peoples and European Explorers 

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Into Space, Grade 6
A Mathematical Journey

This Grade 6 unit, "Into Space" is a Mathematics unit that incorporates expectations from the five strands of The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1-8: Mathematics: Number Sense and Numeration, Measurement, Geometry and Spatial Sense, Patterning and Algebra, and Data Management and Probability. The unit is placed into a Science and Technology context, that of space exploration. These Mathematics activities could be done along with the Science and Technology unit that addresses the expectations dealing with Space. The students will explore and investigate Mathematics concepts and skills through whole group, small group and individual activities, that are engaging, active, and varied (including collaborative and cooperative group work).
Students will collect, organize, display, and analyze data and explore the concepts and skills related to Fractions, Ratio (including Scale), Area, Two-Dimensional Shapes (Plane Figures), and Three-Dimensional Figures (Solid Figures), and Patterning. The resulting understandings and skills will be required in order to complete the Culminating Performance Task.
These skills and new understandings will be consolidated throughout the unit with practice, application, and reflection through Mathematics journals, class work and the culminating task.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Into Space

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Plane Math, Grade 6

Through problem solving, the students will learn:

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS --

 Plane Math

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Flighter than Air, Grade 6

Through classroom demonstrations, investigations, and discussions on air and flight, the students experience many key learning concepts.
Subtask one sets the stage for the unit by having the students create a KWL chart. They be introduced to the various formats that need to be followed to ensure good organization. Also, the steps of the scientific process will be reviewed during this opening lesson.
In subtask two, the students learn that air has many observable qualities such as weight, pressure, expansion (when heated), and the ability to take up space. They generate write-ups on their findings.
In subtask three, the students begin their work on a research project on the history of flight. They learn, with a distinctive Canadian influence, that the history of flight is a vast and intriguing topic.
In subtask four, the students investigate, through the creation of an aerofoil, that the surface over which air flows affects how well an object will lift away from the gravity pulling it down. They realize that the models of flight provided by nature enable us to advance our aviation technology.
In subtask five, the students are involved in a "city council" meeting designed to deal with the possible effects of having an airforce base being built in a city during a period of war. They discuss the question, "Are war planes considered a misuse of flight?"
In subtask six, the students form predictions and applying results during a classroom demonstration on drag and thrust. They will investigate the four main forces of flight (lift, gravity, thrust, and drag) and the importance of maintaining a proper balance between them. The three basic movements of flight will also be examined (yaw, pitch, and roll).
In subtask seven, the students assemble various high flyers.
In subtask eight, the key words from the unit come alive as the students prepare a creative class presentation that utilizes the main terminology in the unit.
The culminating task brings together all the concepts explored during the unit. The students demonstrate this knowledge through the creation of their own special flying machines. An "air show" follows the completion of all of their models of flight.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Flighter than Air

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What are the Odds You'll Get the Job? Data Management and Probability, Grade 6

This mathematics unit, while primarily a Data Management and Probability unit, also includes tasks that require students to develop concepts and skills in the Number Sense and Numeration strands. Students are also required to communicate in written and oral forms, therefore, some language expectations are addressed and assessed.
The culminating task requires students to develop a display/presentation to showcase their products at a trade show. This display/presentation includes a variety of surveys, graphs, tables, graphic organizers, and statements, which demonstrate how the data has been organized, analysed, interpreted, and evaluated. Conclusions and recommendations for a product, based on the data, must be clearly stated in the display. The subtasks involve a series of learning activities in which students collect data through surveys and research, organize their data using computer applications and graphic organizers, present the data using a variety of graphs, and analyse the data to make conclusions. The subtasks build upon each other in order for students to develop an understanding of the cumulative and sequential processes involved in data management. The culminating task requires students to apply these key learnings in order to develop the display/presentation.
Each subtask focuses on a different step in the data management process, and requires students to utilize a problem-solving approach to learning. Within each subtask, students are provided with opportunities to learn through an exploration activity, practise during a focus activity, and demonstrate learning during an assessment activity. Students are also required to reflect on their learning and to communicate their understanding of learning.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

What are the Odds You'll Get the Job

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Electricity Games Galore: Energy and Control, Grade 6

In this unit, students explore how electricity is produced, transformed, manipulated, and refined for use in their community. They use scientific experiments, simulations, research, and model-making to explore and answer questions related to electricity. With this knowledge, students work to design and construct an electronic game.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Electricity Games Galore

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Inside the Circle: First Nations in Canada, Grade 6

Students will engage in activities in social studies, language arts, visual arts, and music to gain an understanding of First Nations.
Social Studies: students will work in research groups to learn about First Nations, their relationship with the environment and contact with explorers.
English: students will be engaged in the study of First Nations stories, poetry, literature and song lyrics. Activities will provide an opportunity to read, listen to, write, and create stories using First Nations teachings. Students will develop the vocabulary necessary for this unit.
Visual Arts: students will study the style and art of world renowned First Nation artist Norval Morrisseau. Students will have the opportunity to create artwork based on this "x-ray" style of painting. There will also be an activity for the creation of a Dream Catcher, often made by First Nations.
Music and Drama: students will be exposed to First Nations music selections and will engage in music appreciation based on the music of Inuit artist Susan Aglukark and drama activities.
The subtasks are meant to be adapted and organized to suit individual class needs.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Inside the Circle

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Settling a New Courntry: Aboriginal People/New France, Grades 6/7

This unit is based on The Ontario Curriculum expectations from Grade 6 Social Studies and the Grade 7 History. Similarities between the two grade levels create four main focus points:

  1. Factors affecting migration
  2. Impact of settlement
  3. Cultural diversity
  4. Development of business and commerce

Key Learnings

Grade 6 (Aboriginal People)
Grade 7 (New France)
Migration Patterns
Settlement
Factors influencing migration patterns and settlements of Aboriginal peoples.
Factors affecting the establishment of early French settlements.

Impact of settlement on on society, health and economics.
Impact of settlement on the development of commerce and business, wars and resulting treaties in New France.

Awareness of cultural diversity within First Nations.
Awareness of Early European settlers.
Outside influences of early explorers on Aboriginal lifestyle.
Melding of lifestyles between native population and early settlers as well as between the French and English settlers.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Settling a New Courntry

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Going Up: Mechanisms and Stability, Grades 6/7

Students will investigate the interrelationship between forces and motion. Grade 6 students will become motion experts, and learn to classify the different types of motion. Grade 7 students will become force and structural experts. They will learn about the different types of forces and how these forces affect the stability of structures.
Students will be involved in a series of lessons in which they will learn about the effects of forces on structures and how mechanisms change one type of motion into another. Students will design and build different types of structures, investigate the different types of motion, identify types of forces, use a variety of mechanisms, and explore real world production.
Students will design and build beams, wagons, and levers. The knowledge from each grade will be needed in the culminating task to produce a structure that involves motion and structural stability. This unit uses cross grade groupings and blends the different expectations with the common threads (i.e., forces and design) that run throughout each grade.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Going Up: Mechanisms and Stability,

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Canada's Trading Partners and Themes of Inquiry,Grades 6/7

Students will use a variety of geographic representation, tools, and technologies to gather, process, and communicate geographic information about Canada's connection to the world.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Canada's Trading Partners and Themes of Inquiry

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EPI, Energy Private Investigators, Grades 6/7

EPI, Energy Private Investigators allows the students to build and develop their skills of inquiry, design, and communication regarding electrical and heat energies, and their effects on our lives and society at large. These skills are acquired through teacher directed-lessons, small group investigations, and individual responses.
Students will take on the role of an investigator to formulate questions, plan investigations, compile data communicate procedures and results, and design and build devices and systems that use heat and electricity. The Catholic learner will apply effective communication, decision making, and problem-solving skills, and contribute to the common good to make life better for all.
The final demonstration of knowledge and skills will require the students to design an energy-efficient home and provide an accompanying brochure highlighting energy conservation tips.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

EPI, Energy Private Investigators

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Geo Visions: Design and Construct: 2D/3D Geometry and Spatial Sense

In general, the students will investigate the properties of three- and two-dimensional shapes and apply their learning to the design, construction, and analysis of a three-dimensional structure/sculpture.

The unit activities will include the following:

Differentiations appropriate to each grade will be described in each subtask.
A glossary of terms is included in the unit. Teachers may wish to display a Word Wall throughout this unit to help students with new terminology.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Geo Visions: Design and Construct: 2D/3D Geometry and Spatial Sense

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Natural Resources

This unit is designed to meet the expectations as outlined in the "Natural Resources" strand for Grade 7 Geography, Ontario Curriculum Grades 1-8 document. The unit focuses on human use of resources and the impact of their use on the environment over time (i.e., supply, demand, availability, and technology).
Teachers may also wish to make natural connections with Language Arts, the "Data Management" strand in Mathematics, and "The Earth's Crust" strand in Science and Technology. Students are required to develop and refine the following skills through the various subtasks: mapping, data analysis and interpretation, research, writing, sorting, and role playing.
Students are introduced to the unit by developing appropriate vocabulary and definitions. Building upon these foundations, students will examine specific natural resources. Using this background, students investigate general issues related to sustainable development and identify differing points of view. The culminating task asks students to present and defend various points of view on how a resource should be used. The students also demonstrate an understanding of alternative points of view through a written article based on a topical resource issue.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Natural Resources

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Themes of Geographic Inquiry, Grade 7
Geography

The culminating Subtask in this unit is Subtask 14: Are You a Life-Saver? in which the final demonstration is a report which uses the five themes of geography as an organizer.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

 Themes of Geopgraphic Inquiry

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L'Alimentation, Grade 7
Bon Appétit, Bonne Santé

Students will read a variety of simple texts on nutrition and health. They will communicate information orally and in writing to inform adolescents about appropriate food choices.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS --

L'Alimentation

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Suspense, Grade 7
Reading, Writing and Viewing

Students will plan, create, and produce a suspenseful dramatization and/or video. Students will demonstrate achievement of specific expectations drawn from the oral communication, reading, writing, and drama strands, supported by music and dance. Film and video techniques will be explored and consolidated.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS --

Suspense

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Conflict and Change: Its Nature and Patterns, Grade 7

Through the exploration of relevant past and present day conflicts, students will understand the nature of conflict: its definition, the different types of conflict, and their causes. They will be provided with several opportunities to apply various conflict resolution strategies in real-world situations and evaluate their effectiveness. Implicit within the nature of conflict is the element of change. Students will examine the change/conflict/change pattern found in both historical and present day events and will probe how change occurs as a consequence of conflict.
Concepts acquired through the exploration of present day conflict and resolution will be applied to the study of the historical events of the Rebellions of Upper and Lower Canada in 1837. Through examination of historical documents, students will research and analyse the issues, key personalities and opposing points of view involved in these rebellious conflicts.
Much of the application of the concepts will take the shape of written responses, a role play, an interview, and the final editing of newspaper creations. Work throughout the unit will be collected in individual student portfolios and used in conjunction with the final newspaper creation.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Conflict and Change

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Heat: Energy and Control

"HOW IS HEAT RELATED TO EVENTS THAT OCCUR IN EVERYDAY LIFE?" The foregoing question provides the central focus for this unit. Students will learn more about the transfer of heat, the capacity of certain materials to hold heat, and how the properties of heat can be applied to natural and human-made environments.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Heat

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Pathways to New Beginnings: British North America

In an effort to gain an overall understanding of British North America, students will explore the following themes:

The student will then produce a time capsule that reflects key historical events surrounding the development of Loyalist communities. By retracing the life of a key historical figure, the student will review the events that led people to leave their homeland and start anew in Canada. The knowledge acquired from the completion of the subtasks will lay the foundation for an independent research on a key personality of this time period. The culminating task will be celebrated by unveiling the time capsule project and presenting its contents.
The time capsule will contain precise historical details in the form of the following:

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Pathways to New Beginnings

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Patterns in Physical Geography

Students will identify and explain land, climate, and vegetation patterns in physical geography. They will explain how these patterns are useful to the study of geography and how they affect human activity.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Patterns in Physical Geography

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The Themes of Geographic Inquiry and Migration, Grades 7/8

Through the use of geographic organizers (i.e., location/place, environment, region, interaction, and movement), the grade 7/8 students will examine the major types of migration and factors affecting mobility. Using tools and technologies of geography, the grade 7/8 students will discover the many ways in which cultures are affected by migration. They will describe patterns and trends, and their effects on Canada.

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

The Themes of Geographic Inquiry and Migration

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Turning Up the Heat: A Unit of Study Investigating Heat Energy, Grade 7

Students will investigate how heat affects all aspects of life from basic survival to the compositional changes of matter. Students will participate in various activities and investigations whereby they will experience firsthand the effects of heat. Catholic expectations are integrated throughout the student activities and form the foundation for the entire unit of study.

The unit is divided into three general categories:

  1. Investigations;
  2. Application of learned knowledge;
  3. Putting it all together.

Working through the investigations, students will experience first hand the key elements of Heat. They will take part in a range of investigations demonstrating molecular motion, Particle-theory, conduction, convection, radiation, changing states of matter, insulation and the effects of heat on volume.
Students will apply knowledge gained from investigation to real life. They will be given the opportunity to demonstrate mastery of the expectations through all subtasks.
A "glossary of key terms" has been provided for reference purposes.
Finally, the students will experience the connection between the learned knowledge and the world outside of school in the culminating task.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Turning Up the Heat

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Life Systems: Interacting Organisms Grade 7/8

Students will continue to develop their knowledge of systems and living things. An understanding and appreciation of the diversity and interdependence of God's creations will be integral throughout the unit. Students will engage in several hands-on activities, research, and scientific investigations relating to organisms. They will develop a personal moral perspective on issues relating to themselves and their surrounding environment.
Students will be required to demonstrate knowledge of the basic structure and function of plant and animal cells. They will investigate the hierarchical units of living things, which will include working within the larger framework of ecosystems, as well as studing cells and organ systems within the human body.
Finally, they will be required to demonstrate the long-term effects of human activities and technological innovations on the sustainability of ecosystems and human body systems.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Life Systems: Interacting Organisms

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World Travels, Grade 7/8
Mathematics Unit

Students travel from country to country to complete a variety of investigations that centre primarily on skills, knowledge and concepts in the Measurement and Geometry & Spatial Sense strands. In particular, Grade 7 students will work on tasks pertaining to area and perimeter of a trapezoid, rectangular prisms, and transformational geometry, and Grade 8 students will work on tasks related to radius, circumference and diameter, triangular prisms, and the Pythagorean Theorem.
Each of the mathematics tasks is centred on the theme of 'structures' which prepares students for their culminating task in which they design, build, and present a model of a structure. Therefore, these activities will include such skills as developing and using blueprints (top, side, and front), and estimating, measuring, and discussing the dimensions of structures. The subtasks are sequenced in such a way that the students have ample opportunities to learn about and practise the identified skills, concepts, and knowledge before their performance is assessed in later subtasks.
A variety of self and teacher assessment tools are used throughout the unit. These include observation (with each subtask), rubrics, and checklists.
During the unit students complete an entry in their travel journal after each subtask is completed in order to communicate their understanding of mathematics skills and concepts. Each journal entry is a response to one or more prompts outlined in the subtask, following the format outlined in the first subtask. The completion of each journal entry will allow the students to have their passport stamped and therefore move on to the next country and subsequent mathematics task(s). Three times during the unit the students choose one entry to edit, revise, and submit for scoring (see Notes to Teacher for more information).
The passport's primary function is to serve as a tracking and assessment tool for both student and teacher (e.g., date each task is completed, teacher stamp and feedback on student performance).

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS --

World Travels

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Confederation, Grade 8

The culminating activity in this unit is Subtask 5: A Confederation Newspaper/News Special, in which the final demonstration is either a series of July 1, 1867 front page stories from the perspective of the Aboriginal peoples and of each participating colony, or a series of reports/interviews/commentaries representing each of these perspectives.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

 Confederation

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Racing Against Time, Grade 8
A Decision Making Challenge

In this unit students will work on a simulated task, a submission to the International Track and Field Commission (I.T.F.C.) recommending criteria for a new annually awarded medal, "World's Best Runner".
Students will prepare themselves by completing up to five subtasks each. Each subtask involves applying new knowledge and developing skills and attitudes in order to make informed decisions. The last of the subtasks is the process for making The Final Decision and preparing a submission to the I.T.F.C. The unit requires students to analyse and solve problems using math and language demonstrating that often the best solutions integrate logical and creative thinking.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

 Racing Against Time

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Structure and Mechanisms: Mechanical Efficiency

Students will explore and demonstrate an understanding of the factors that contribute to the efficient operation of mechanisms and systems (e.g., simple machines, Pascal's Law, forces that affect movement, velocity ratio, hydraulics and pneumatics, consumer needs).
Through the opportunities explored in the subtasks, students will be able to design and make a mechanical toy device, that will move a given object a specified vertical and horizontal distance, and investigate the efficiency of the mechanical device.
Students will be given opportunities to explore and demonstrate understanding of the factors that can affect the manufacturing of a product, including the needs of the consumer. They will then be required to present their mechanical toy devices in light of their findings.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Structure and Mechanisms: Mechanical Efficiency

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Turn Up the Radio! Canada's Changing

The students will begin the unit by exploring the changing society of Canada through activities focusing on visual images of the 1900s. They will compare and contrast the past and present uses of technology to demonstrate an understanding of the historical significance of change in society.
Through a simulation activity, students will experience the division of labour process. Economic and social issues of the 1900s will be introduced through a series of dramatizations. Students will prepare fact sheets on the topics.
Using graphic organizers, students will outline differing points of view surrounding five key issues facing Prime Minister Wilfrid Laurier. The issue of immigration will be investigated by creating a timeline of the early 1900s and comparing historical policies to current policies. World War I will be explored through a series of group presentations. Propaganda posters will be created to simulate the issue of war recruitment and the importance of supplies for the army overseas.
Students will discuss the implications of the Treaty of Versailles. "The War to End All Wars" will be examined through the eyes of the participating countries. To investigate the impact of war on Canadian society, students will role-play characters from these countries and voice their concerns. Student presentations will provide more in-depth information.
Students will analyse and apply the information acquired in the subtasks to produce a war-time radio documentary.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Turn Up the Radio! Canada's Changing

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Canada: A Changing society: A Historical Investigation

This unit is designed to meet the expectations as outlined in the "Canada: A Changing Society" Strand for Grade 8 History, Ontario Curriculum Grades 1-8 document. The unit focuses on change and the impact of change on people. Particular attention is paid to the impact of change on families, women, and workers during the period of Canadian history between Confederation and World War I. The Industrial Revolution in Canada and the subsequent growth of cities, changes in industry, agriculture, and the daily lives of Canadians provide a primary focus for the unit; the impact of World War I on the lives of Canadians provides a context for the culminating task.

"In studying Canada as a changing society, students focus on why and how changes occur in society. They examine social and economic factors, as well as individuals and groups related to promoting change in Canada up to 1918. Canada's involvement in World War 1 is studied, with emphasis on the impact on both Canadians and the world community." (The Ontario Curriculum 1-8, 1998, Social Studies, History and Geography, p 53.)

It is strongly recommended that teachers of Grade 8 history also consult the Ontario Curriculum for Grade 10 Canadian and World Studies. The events of World War I and Canada's involvement are covered in the compulsory Grade 10 Canadian and World Studies history courses. A broader perspective on the history curriculum in the intermediate division may prove to be very helpful.

Teachers may also wish to make natural thematic links using the "Change" topic in Language Arts, Art, or Choices into Action. Teachers should find links to the history strand, "Opening of the Canadian West," to be helpful; some integration or review of complementary expectations will help students to consolidate prior knowledge in preparation for this unit of study.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Canada: A Changing society: A Historical Investigation

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A Growing Nation

Students begin the unit by thinking about what it means to grow as a person and how a nation grows. In this combined grade unit, common themes for both grades act as the foundation for the subtask. Each subtask begins by asking students to think about their personal experiences and links a current issue with historical events. The common themes are based on settlement patterns and daily life of communities, friendships, and social groups, rivalries and feeling alienated, conflict and negotiation. These themes are examined to determine the overall impact on society and how these events contributed to the growth of Canada as a nation. After class discussions on each theme, students from each grade work through activities appropriate to their grade levels.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

A Growing Nation

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B.N.A./Developing West

Understanding the situations of newcomers to a new and potentially harsh environment after suffering the shock of dislocation from their previous homes requires the learner to be aware of the conditions that met the Loyalists in Upper Canada and settlers in the Canadian West.
Appreciation of the difficulties in starting anew after relocating from their homeland in an environment that was unfamiliar and often unfriendly requires knowledge of the physical conditions; required daily activities that ensured the continuance of life; daily, monthly, and yearly difficulties to be overcome; and the very spartan and often lonely lifestyle that was carved out of the new wilderness of Canada by the pioneers of Upper Canada and the West.
Students will discover, through a field trip or simulation, the work schedules, crops to be planted, social activities, and other aspects of settlers' lives in their new communities. They will be aware of the various difficulties and dangers that were very much a part of the daily and seasonal life of the pioneers of Canada and how individuals were dependent upon the compassion and generosity of others.
Students will be responsible for independent research and study of their particular project choice but will gain some information and insights when their chosen personality's contribution to history is illuminated as part of a subtask. Thus, they will gain the big picture through a series of unit subtasks, but will focus on one representative of the historic period through their independent study.
Through the individual oral presentations of their classmates and by examining all the pizza box projects (see Culminating Task) when they go on display, each student's knowledge of the general theme of the settlement of Canada will be reinforced and they will be able to appreciate the contributions of individuals over a wide time span using the timeline developed in the first lesson.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

B.N.A./Developing West

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Bubbles in the Hot Tub

Bubbles in the Hot Tub is a Science and Technology unit prepared for teachers of combined 7/8 classes. This unit is designed to engage both grade level students, and allow for the simultaneous teaching of concepts from both curricula. The majority of subtasks and the culminating task will be taught and completed by all students although the assessment for each subtask will be grade specific.
Through drama, demonstrations, and hands-on investigations, students will be introduced to the particle theory. The particle theory will then serve as the foundation for students' explanations and predictions on topics such as temperature, changes in matter, heat transfer (conduction, convection, radiation), and properties of fluids (viscosity, density, buoyancy).
Students will apply their understanding of the buoyancy and density relationship as they create their own hydrometers. Similarily, grade 7 students will apply their knowledge of heat transfer to create their own insulated container, whereas, the grade 8 students will use the concept of hydraulic or pneumatic systems to create a toy.
Throughout the unit, students will be identifying examples in the natural world where heat and fluids are found, including the water cycle. They will consider how society has used and continues to use the characteristics of heat and fluids, and the impact this has on the environment.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Bubbles in the Hot Tub

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Natural resources and Economic Systems

This grade 7 Natural Resources and grade 8 Economic Systems combined unit, focuses on the different ways people use resources, how the resources are harvested, processed and distributed, how their value is influenced by demand and accessibility, and how employment trends are related to this sector of the economy. A group report on use of natural resources in terms of employment and future sustainability is the final activity.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Natural Resources and Economic Systems

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Migration

This unit relies on strong cooperative/collaborative learning structures. Consistent with the important concepts and "enduring understandings" of this topic, opportunities for respect for diversity, for active listening, for empathy and mutual understanding, the students will be expected to work in groups for most of this unit and the teacher will have considerable opportunity to cultivate a context for collaboration and positive learning strategies. The students should gain an understanding of the importance of cultural diversity in Canada, of the challenges faced by immigrants to any country , as well as an understanding of the contributions of a variety of cultures to modern Canadian society.
Teachers are encouraged to make connections to other subject areas. A range of Canadian novels is available for classroom connections to concepts and themes investigated in this unit. A brief list of resources is included with this unit but is by no means comprehensive. Teachers may also wish to include resources available in their local communities (representatives from cultural groups or multicultural learning centres, etc.) in order to customize the learning context for students in their classes.
Expectations have been selected and linked to subtasks and to the culminating task. Important concepts to be revisited and reinforced over the unit are identified by subtask.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Migration

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Optics: Energy and Control

Students will investigate the question, "HOW DOES UNDERSTANDING THE PROPERTIES AND CHARACTERISTICS OF LIGHT HELP US TO ENHANCE OUR QUALITY OF LIFE?". Students will then apply knowledge gained though the unit in order to create an optical device.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Optics.

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Economic Systems

Students will demonstrate an understanding of economic systems and the factors that influence them. They will use a variety of geographic representations, tools, and technologies to gather, process, and communicate geographic information to prepare a final report describing the impact of a new industry on the economy of a region.

This unit has:

UNIQUE EXPECTATIONS

Economic Systems

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